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Six Flags announces 'new' guest conduct policy

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Published: October 18, 2006 at 1:40 PM

Six Flags today announced a new chain-wide code of conduct for its park visitors.

Here's the press release

It's nothing radically different than anything other theme park companies, or even some Six Flags parks have done in the past. In short:

  • No line-jumping or place holding
  • No "unruly, disruptive or offensive behavior"
  • Gotta wear shirts and "appropriate" shoes.
  • No clothes with "rude, vulgar or offensive language or graphics."
  • Swimsuits in the water park only
  • They'll toss you for any of the above, or for profanity or abusive language or gestures.

    The signal by releasing the policy though should make clear that current Six Flags management really, really, really doesn't want its parks to be the daytime summer home for crowds of A&F-wearing, line-jumping, trash-talking teen-agers anymore.

  • Readers' Opinions

    From Anthony Murphy on October 18, 2006 at 2:47 PM
    GOOOD!

    But to tell you the truth, we had more problems with people not wearing clotes than just snobby teens. The no shirt rule was really not enforced at SFGA. Also, people seemed to be "trashy" there as well. Sorry for being so judgemental, but there are alot of people there that act really stupid. Never really see this at Disney World or Universal. I wonder why...

    Good job to Six Flags though, however, many of these should go without saying!

    What is "appropriate" shoes anyway?

    From Ryan Lanning on October 18, 2006 at 4:39 PM
    Fantastic!!! I think thet they will have a hard time enforcing the profanity rule. Marine World is fine, but Magic Mountain was horribly infested with teens swearing and line-jumping and waling around without any clothes on. I imagine Marine World attracts families more than teens with its animal shows. I congratulate Six Flags!
    From Scott Seal on October 18, 2006 at 6:36 PM
    Good thing. Nothing ruins a theme park visit like annoying guests. I like the old Disney rules: collared shirt required.

    Seriously, I think I'd institute a ticketing system. With all the new electronic systems and barcoded tickets and visitor info systems, I'd have park security walk the park like cops do neighborhoods. They'd be on the beat. If they caught you f'n up, they scan your ticket. Two strikes and you're out.

    This rule would also apply to large groups, of 8 or more. More than five violations by any combination of members of your party and you're out of here.

    Rules only work when everyone follows them. Otherwise, law abiders miss out while outlaws cut line, steal stuff, and horse-around.

    Good for Six Falgs. Now, will they actually enforce it?

    From scott sorensen on October 18, 2006 at 7:23 PM
    This sounds wonderful in principle but only if they enforce the rules. Most of the Six Flags parks already have similar rules posted however they do nothing to enforce them. SF needs to make their parks more family friendly. They should understand that families are the ones that spend more money on the merchandise that will increase their revenue. So this announcement sound great; let's just see if they back it up.
    From Jessie Phillips on October 18, 2006 at 11:57 PM
    well I have stated many times before that 6 flags is an inexpensive babysitter. I hope that 6 flags enforces it, but I highly doubt it. I also wonder, is 6 flags going to be open other than when the kids are out of school and keep later hours? I doubt that too. I also predict that 6 flags season passes will drop off ALOT. Now if they can get rid of the basketballs. The vulgar T-shirts has been in place for about 15 years and it isn't enforced, also the same with line-jumping and place-holding. I still say that 6 flags should be 6 flags and not try to be disney or universal.
    From Scott Seal on October 19, 2006 at 5:31 AM
    Well, everybody here has stated it pretty well. Enforcment. What good are rules if you don't have to follow them? If people aren't kicked out for their behavior problems, then why even have rules?
    From Derek Potter on October 19, 2006 at 6:29 AM
    A&F wearing? I thought that Hollister was all the rage now....

    Anyway, like everyone else has said, the key here is enforcement. They can make rules and put up signs all they want, but will they enforce those rules. Obviously they are directed at those youngins (and some oldins believe it or not) that do all of these things in abundance at their parks now. Seems to me that they will have to make examples of a few people to really quell the problem. They never followed the rules in the first place, so whats to say they will now. Time to beef up the security staff. I hope that they are successful, because doing so will erase one of the things on the list that is wrong with Six Flags. If they are going to charge that kind of money for stuff, the customer experience needs to be a whole lot better. This is a step, provided the company follows through with enforcement.

    From Matthew Baker on October 19, 2006 at 8:14 AM
    Just so I can keep wearing my silly hats to the park or for that matter any park, that's all I care. :) Seriously though, I was at MM in August and I think those same rules were already in effect. Dunno about enforcement though; there was a good bit of my favorite pet peeve--line jumping--going on like always for example. (As an aside, "place-holding" is kind of a moot point: the person who cuts through the line to get back to "their spot" is the one committing the infraction, not the "place-holder" who was (presumably?) doing nothing more than waiting in line the whole time like everybody else.)

    I'm thinking the profanity and gesture issue has to do with talking/acting out, rather than subdued conversation within a group.

    From Greg Shilton on October 19, 2006 at 9:33 AM
    I think the whole obscene gestures are like flipping off the camera while on a ride. Also, I have trouble with how they are planning on enforcing the "no swearing" issue. Will they put soap in the peoples mouths?

    I digress.

    Anywho, I LOVE these new rules. Come on families, it's a better place for your kids! (At least it should be)

    From John Leggett on October 19, 2006 at 10:06 AM
    Good stuff. Hope Disney, Universal etc adopt the no place holding as it really gets me wound up.
    From Scott Seal on October 19, 2006 at 2:05 PM
    Wait. What's wrong with place holding?

    If I stand in for another person who went to get some water before they die, you're waiting behind two people, regardless of whether or not they were physically standing there.

    I guess it's for the kids who see their friends in the park and then let them cut, claiming that "he was already here". I hate that.

    From W.G. Overman on October 19, 2006 at 2:28 PM
    I think it is easier to announce a rule change than to enforce the rules already in place.
    From Robert OGrosky on October 19, 2006 at 3:23 PM
    Line jumping is letting anyone in front of someone else in line. If you want water, get the water before you get in line!! If someone is near death due to lack of water, then I doubt they will reding any rides anyway.
    From Erik Yates on October 19, 2006 at 4:30 PM
    I dont know. While all these rules are really a good thing, just pondering why you need to tell people things that should be common sense. Are we all really that stupid that now we have to be told what to do?
    And who is going to define "offensive" or "profaine". Just because I use an expletive doesnt neccesarily mean that I think its profane.....are we going to abide by the Carlin rule of the 7 dirty words? I'm all for people behaving, just not all for people telling me how to do it.....goes beyond theme parks I guess.
    From Donna Blake on October 20, 2006 at 2:31 AM
    SF is not really a place I would go....I am not the biggest roller coaster fan. BUT...I have 5 kids and half of them are teens now and I bet I don't get away with not going to a SF or similar type park in the long run...lol!

    Most everything has already been addressed in the comment section but I have a thought...If I am in line waiting for an hour or more for a ride and one of my kids or myself has to go weeeeee....

    I would have my husband stay in line, go and return to the spot where he was by the time I was done. Its not a completely frequent occurance but I did do that at D-land a few times when we went on our 5 day visit a couple of years ago. It would be completely ridiculous to have to start all over at the back of the line when those lines are completely ridiculous sometimes.

    So the place holding thing, although aimed at rude people cutting period, would tick me off if someone tried to enforce it on me and I was legitimately rejoining my family.

    From Scott Seal on October 20, 2006 at 5:27 AM
    See, I agree.

    It's just like FastPass. Those people are ahead of you in line, whether they are standing there or not. If a person's spot is being held by their spouse, friend, whatever, and they come back in stand in front of you, nobody cut you in line. YOu're waiting just as long as you always were, because that person was already *there*.

    It's like a ghost-man in kickball. There's a guy on second...even though there's no guy on second.

    From Mark Freedman on October 20, 2006 at 7:14 AM
    Unless Six Flags plans and pays for a large increase of it's security and policing forces, this is nothing more than PR spin for Wall Street. Since the hostile takeover, Snyder has shown zero competence in running the parks - dropping Mr. Six in favor of cockroach eating promotions is proof positive.
    From Michael Whitehead on October 20, 2006 at 10:09 PM
    I am surprised to see people justifying "holding" a place in line. The fact of the matter is, it is illegal and against almost all park rules. If it is a hot day, bring water with you in the line. Pee BEFORE you get in line. And wait until all members of your party are there before you get in line. They make these rules for a good reason. People abuse "holding" a place in line all the time, and the only fair wait to insure that this does not happen is to ban it completely. And that means YOU. I am always amazed at people who think THEY are the exception or are too good to follow the rules. Think of what would happen if every one in line was saving a place for a family member. Suddenly instead of 50 people in head of you, there is a hundred and you have to wait twice as long as you thought to board the ride. That is why it has to be banned completely for any reason. Cedar Point clearly states on their map that cutting the line for ANY reason can lead to dismissal from the park. I know when I am in line, no one gets in front of me. Rules have to be enforced or they are no good. This also applies to the conduct policy announced by Six Flags. I applaud the policy, but it has to be strictly enforced.
    From Matthew Baker on October 21, 2006 at 7:27 AM
    I think the real problem is justifying leaving and then cutting to get back to where you were. There's no justification: if you leave, the only place you belong upon getting back in line is the end--period. If I'm waiting with somebody, they ditch to go do something and then cut in line to get back next to me and claim I was "holding their spot", I shouldn't be faulted for that any more than I should be faulted if somebody I don't know cuts in line next to me. I was just waiting for my turn like everybody else. Just to clarify, I won't actively hold a place for any reason (and will make that clear ahead of time), but I can't and won't be responsible for the people I'm with if they line-jump (unless I'm supposed to be supervising them of course). And no I'm not gonna tattle-tell on them, although I doubt I'll defend them if they do get in trouble for it.
    From Zachary Lee on October 22, 2006 at 10:39 AM
    Maybe they will actually inforce these rules. Let's hope. Because if they don't they will never see the family audience again.

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